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Why Everyone Should Work as a Journalist Once in Their Lifetime

Embarking on a journey into the universe of journalism, I never anticipated the profound impact it would have on shaping not just my career, but my entire perspective on life. Originating from a business-oriented family in the historic city of Agra, my fascination with the visual medium of communication ignited at a tender age of 13, flipping through the pages of travel magazines. Little did I know that this spark would lead me to pursue a career as a photojournalist, capturing the essence of life through captivating images.


Following my passion, I pursued a degree in Mass Communication and Journalism from Bennett University, delving deep into the multifaceted world of media. However, it was not until I landed my first job at ThePrint that I truly grasped the transformative power of journalism. Reflecting on my journey, I am convinced that everyone should experience the world of journalism at least once in their lifetime.


Ocean of Perspectives


Entering the dynamic environment of a newsroom exposes you to a diverse array of perspectives. Unlike the sheltered environments of school and college, the workplace brings together individuals from varied backgrounds, ideologies, and experiences. Interacting with people who hail from different parts of the country broadens your horizons and fosters a deeper understanding of the world around you. Journalists, I discovered, adorn themselves not with material ornaments but with the richness of their thoughts and ideas.


Perspective of Different Fields


Working in a newsroom offers the opportunity to explore diverse fields and topics. During your trainee period you are asked to try your hands on different beats/topics. During my days at ThePrint, I got a chance to cover national politics, defence, covid–19, day-to-day news etc. I stumbled upon my passion for science journalism while editing a show at ThePrint, named Pure Science. 


Every story becomes a journey of discovery, pushing you to delve into unfamiliar territories and expand your intellectual horizons.


Touch Base with Reality


Journalism is synonymous with bearing witness to reality. Venturing into the field, I had the privilege of experiencing firsthand the lives of people from various walks of life. From interviewing ministers to documenting the struggles of rag pickers, journalism exposes you to the stark realities of society. It is through these on-the-ground experiences that one gains a deeper understanding of the world and its complexities, transcending the confines of privilege and perception.



Confidence and Building Persona


The rigors of journalism cultivate confidence and shape one's persona. Engaging in on-camera reporting (more commonly known as piece to camera) and meticulous research hones your communication skills and fosters self-assurance. Moreover, the professional environment of a newsroom instills a sense of discipline and refinement, reflecting in one's demeanour and presentation. The ability to articulate ideas coherently and exude confidence becomes second nature, both on and off the screen.



Presence of Mind


Journalism demands acute awareness and presence of mind. Whether reporting from the field or editing behind the scenes, every word and action must be meticulously calculated. Anticipating unfolding events, formulating pertinent questions, and capturing critical moments require unwavering focus and agility. This heightened state of alertness extends beyond the newsroom, enriching one's perception of the world and enhancing problem-solving skills in everyday life.



In conclusion, my tenure in journalism not only honed my professional skills but also enriched my personal growth. Beyond the skills of curating rich journalistic videos, it fostered a profound connection with reality and instilled a deep sense of empathy and understanding. Embracing the challenges and rewards of journalism is not merely a career choice but a transformative journey that offers invaluable lessons for life's endeavours.


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